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Installation Step 2: Lay Out the System

BASIC PLANNING TIPS

WARNING Underground cables can carry high voltage. Have all underground cables marked before you dig to bury
your wire. In most areas, this is a free service. Avoid these cables when you dig.

LAY OUT THE SYSTEM

  • The Boundary Wire MUST start at the Fence Transmitter and make a continuous loop back (2A).
  • Design a layout that is suitable for your yard. Sample layouts are provided on the following page, and a grid for designing your layout is provided on page 26 of your manual.
  • Always use gradual turns at the corners to produce a more consistent boundary (2B). Do not use sharp turns, as this will cause gaps in your boundary.
  • We recommend setting a Boundary Width for the Warning and Stimulation Zones to approximately 16 - 24 feet (8 - 12 feet on each side of the wire).
  • The Collar Receiver can be activated inside the house if the Boundary Wire runs along the outside wall of the house. If this occurs, remove your dog’s Collar Receiver before bringing him inside, decrease the range using the Range Adjuster or consider an alternative layout.

SAMPLE LAYOUTS

Sample 1: Perimeter Loop (Single Loop)
The Perimeter Loop is the most common layout. This will allow your dog to freely and safely roam your entire property (2C). It can also protect gardens, pools and landscaping (2D).

Sample 2 (2E): Perimeter Loop Using Existing Fence (Single Loop)

This layout allows you to include your existing fence as part of your layout and keeps your dog from jumping out or digging under it. It reduces the amount of wire which will need to be buried. From the Fence Transmitter, run the wire to A, A to B, B to C, C to D, D to E, E to A, twisting the wires from A back to the Fence Transmitter. See the “Install the Boundary Wire” section for more information on attaching the wire to a fence (pages 14-15 of the user manual).

 

DOUBLE LOOP

A Double Loop must be used when you are not establishing the Boundary Area on all sides of your property.

When using a Double Loop, the Boundary Wire must be separated by a minimum of THREE TO FIVE FEET to avoid canceling the signal. Remember that a Double Loop will require twice as much wire.

Sample 3: Front or Back Yard Only (Double Loop)

From the Fence Transmitter, run the wire to A, A to B, B to C, C to D, D to E, E to F, make a U-turn and follow your path all the way back to A, keeping the wire separated three to five feet.

Twist the wire from A back to the Fence Transmitter.

 

 

 

Sample 4: Front Boundary Only (Double Loop)

From the Fence Transmitter, run the wire to A, A to B, B back to A keeping the wire separated three to five feet.

Twist the wire from A back to the Fence Transmitter.

 

 

 

Sample 5: Lake Access (Double Loop)

From the Fence Transmitter, run the wire to A, A to B, make a U-turn and go to C, C to D,D to E, make a U-turn and follow your path all the way back to A keeping wire separated three to five feet.

Twist the wire from A back to the Fence Transmitter.

 

 

Sample 6: Wire Loop Attached to Existing Fence (Double Loop)

This layout allows you to include your existing fence as part of your layout and keeps your dog from jumping out or digging under it. It reduces the amount of wire which will need to be buried.

Run the wire from the Fence Transmitter to A, A to B, B to C, C to D, D to E, E to F, make a U-turn and follow your path all the way back to A, keeping the wire separated three to five feet.

Twist the wire from A back to the Fence Transmitter. See the “Install the Boundary Wire” section for more information on attaching the wire to a fence (pages 14-15).

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